Our Mission

The mission of the Directors Guild–Producer Training Plan is to provide motion picture and television industry training as directed by the Alliance of Motion Picture & Television Producers and the Directors Guild of America.

 

The Assistant Directors Training Program recruits a diverse group of applicants from across the United States and provides selected candidates with education, training and paid experience in professional settings, facilitating their development into successful Assistant Directors. The Training Program’s ultimate goal is to provide the Directors Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture & Television Producers with Assistant Directors of the highest quality and professionalism.

 

The Directors Guild-Producer Training Plan offers safety training to Directors Guild of America covered employees and provides seminars covering current changes to collective bargaining agreements and local, state and federal filming regulations; to all motion picture and television industry employees, working within the classifications of Unit Production Manager and Assistant Director.

 

* Note that we do not train participants to be producers or directors.  This program offers training specifically to learn the craft of an Assistant Director.

The Role of The Assistant Director

Communication

Communicating the on-going status of all elements of production to everyone associated with the production, including constantly advising the ADs of their own location and the location of actors and crew, as well as what tasks they have completed and when they were completed.  Quickly relaying changes in schedule and plans to actors, crew, background, and the production office.  Distributing paperwork, schedules, scripts and script revisions (as prioritized by the ADs) to actors, crew and background.

Set Operations

Assisting the ADs in running the set by helping set background action, coordinating crowd and traffic control, maintaining quiet on the set during rehearsals and shots, loudly and clearly relaying instructions given by ADs on set, addressing large and small groups of people by making announcements, and by helping to solve problems that may interrupt actual shooting.

Paperwork

Accurately completing detailed paperwork on a daily basis and delivering that paperwork to the production office at the day’s end.

Scheduling

Work hours are long and often involve protracted periods of near-constant movement.  The typical workday is 12 to 16 hours.  The work schedule within a given project can shift radically.  For example, working Monday through Friday and shifting to a Wednesday through Sunday schedule after several weeks.  Alternatively, starting the week working from 6:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. and ending the week working from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 a.m. the following morning.

Organization

Organizing the movement of actors and background in and out of the make-up, hair and wardrobe departments and verifying and communicating when actors, background and crew are due to set.  Escorting actors and background to the set, properly prepared and on time, and signing them out when dismissed from set.

Creative Problem Solving

Organizing the movement of actors and background in and out of the make-up, hair and wardrobe departments and verifying and communicating when actors, background and crew are due to set.  Escorting actors and background to the set, properly prepared and on time, and signing them out when dismissed from set.